Franklin | Brentwood Edition – June 2022

2022 FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

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HEALTH CARE EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 4 JUNE 13 JULY 10, 2022

Mental health remains a top concern in Williamson County Eort aims to mobilize resources, spur initiatives

FINDING HEALTH NEEDS Williamson County’s recent Community Health Needs Assessment, done every three years, surveyed residents about possible causes of community health challenges.

BY MARTIN CASSIDY

Mindy Tate, CEO of Franklin Tomor- row, a local nonpro‹t that has been involved with helping guide the eort. Assessing health data Since 2013, nonpro‹t hospitals have been required by the Aordable Care Act to conduct a CHNA every three years to preserve their tax-exempt sta- tus. The study gathers input from res- idents, local health departments and other agencies to develop initiatives to improve health. In February, a committee review- ing the data on the region’s health voted to designate Williamson Coun- ty’s four broad areas—mental health; aordable housing; healthy living and prevention; and substance misuse— as those most in need of community attention. “We provide some funds for organi- zations that work on the issues, but the biggest thing is just sitting at the table working collaboratively with every- one,” said Elisa Friedman, associate

D

Tackling mental health, aordable housing and other priorities are part of a joint eort between Williamson County and two area hospitals to com- prehensively address the area’s press- ing health needs. While data shows in some ways Wil- liamson County is one of the healthier areas in the state, health care ocials and others said the region faces an important need for dialogue in the areas of mental health awareness, expand- ing aordable housing and access to medical care, based on results of the Community Health Needs Assessment released this spring. The assessment, or CHNA, which began in May 2021, is being conducted jointly by Vanderbilt University Med- ical Center, Ascension St. Thomas Hospital and the county’s health department for the third time. “While we might be a healthy place, we’re not immune to the issues being faced around the state, around the country and around the world,” said

Individual factors A: 41% Community factors B: 25% Organizational involvement C: 22% Policy decisions D: 11%

A

What prevents all people in Williamson County from being as healthy as possible?

C

B

Community: access to primary care; prescription drug costs Organizational: a ordable healthy food; transportation Public policy: wider Medicaid coverage; less divisiveness Individual change: work-life balance; preventative care Interpersonal: interpersonal dynamics

A: 42%

E

If you could make one or two changes to ensure all residents of Williamson County are as healthy as possible, what would those changes be?

D

B: 35%

A

C

C: 15%

D: 5%

B

E: 3%

SOURCE: 2022 WILLIAMSON COUNTY COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“THESE WERE PRIORITIES GENERATED BY PEOPLE IN OUR COMMUNITY AND WHAT THEY THINK ARE IMPORTANT NEEDS.” KEN MOORE, FRANKLIN MAYOR

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2022

HEALTH CARE EDITION

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and P•ugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 40 hyperlocal editions across three states with circulation more than 2.8 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM LAUREN: Welcome to our 2022 Health Care edition. Along with our health care stories, we’ve compiled a list of local hospitals and clinics, and a snapshot page condensing gures on COVID-19 vaccination rates, life expectancy and more. Please contact us at [email protected] if there are Franklin and Brentwood business or community news items you would like to read more about. Lauren Itz, GENERAL MANAGER

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FROM MARTIN: Our front-page story for this edition delves into Williamson County’s just nished 2022 Community Health Needs Assessment, a joint e‰ort of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, St. Thomas Ascension Hospital and the county. A lack of mental health services and high housing costs are identied as two major areas of concern. Hopefully our work this month can contribute to more active discussion of the community’s overall well-being. Martin Cassidy, EDITOR

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FRANKLIN Š BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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NOW OPEN 1 Aldi , a supermarket at 209 S. Royal Oaks Blvd., Franklin, reopened May 12 after a remodeling, according to the company’s website. The renovation provided a new layout for customers and more refrigerated space. The Batavia, Illinois, based company announced in February it was aiming to add 150 new stores in the United States this year, including a continued expansion in the Gulf Coast region. 855-955-2534. www.aldi.us 2 Elite Sports Medicine and Orthopedics , a Nashville-based orthopedics practice, opened a location April 25 in a new building at 5021 Carothers Parkway, Franklin, according to its website. The staŒ includes “sub-specialized orthopedists” treating musculoskeletal injuries and disabilities of the feet, hands, elbows, hip and back, according to the business’ website. Elite shares the 21,600-square-foot building with MPOWER Physical Therapy, a clinic that oŒers personal training, physical therapy and massage therapy. 615-567-5750. www.eliteorthopaedic.com www.mpowermd.com 3 Franklin Christian Church hosted a dedication service for its $12 million new church at 4040 Clovercroft Road in Franklin on June 12, according to Minister David Welsh, pastor of the church. The church held a May 22 grand opening worship service, including tours of the new building, Welsh said. The new building includes an auditorium and more classroom and fellowship space, according to Welsh. 615-790-6605. www.franklinchristianchurch.com

4 Guthrie Facial Plastic Surgery opened a new oœce at 1001 Health Park Drive, Ste. 320, Brentwood, on May 9, according to Dr. Ashley J. Guthrie, the owner of the practice. Guthrie performs a wide range of surgical procedures, including face, neck, brow and lip lifts; rhinoplasty; otoplasty; facial implants; and hair transplants. Nonsurgical services include dermal ¡llers, Botox and radio frequency microneedling. 615-880-9500. www.drashleyguthrie.com 5 Mooyah Burgers, Fries & Shakes , a Texas-based fast-casual restaurant, opened a new location May 16 at 1560 W. McEwen Drive, Ste. 160, in Southside at McEwen in Cool Springs, according to the company’s social media channels. Mooyah serves never-frozen certi¡ed Angus beef, all-natural turkey and black bean burgers, according to the website. The restaurant also has eight milkshake ¢avors. The company recently celebrated its 15th anniversary. The chain also operates a location at 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 160, in Brentwood. 615-905-4920. www.mooyah.com 6 Radish , a health food fast-casual restaurant, opened a location May 24 at 4041 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 106, Franklin, in the McEwen Northside development, according to an announcement. The eatery, founded by chef Amanda Frederickson, serves customizable items, including salads, grain bowls and pita wraps, according to its website. The restaurant’s menu also has gluten-free, vegetarian and dairy- free options, according to its website. 615-613-3338- www.radishkitchen.com

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7 Sir Massage , a wellness and massage spa, opened April 12 at 7024 Church St. E., Brentwood, according to the owner Patricia Mendes. The interior design of the spa is meant to cater to males with a complimentary bourbon bar and treatments. Treatments include Swedish, sport and hot stone massages, Mendes said. 629-256-3190. www.vagaro.com/sirmassage 8 Wild Sage Studio , a full-service hair salon and skin spa, opened on June 7 at 2000 Mallory Lane, Ste. 630, Franklin, according to owner Andrea Schreiber. The business has ¡ve salon stylist stations, two full-time aestheticians and a registered nurse on staŒ. The business oŒers men’s and women’s haircuts, coloring and hair treatments; facial cleanses, chemical peels, hydraderma abrasion and microneedling, Schreiber said. 615-771-9379. www.wildsagestudiotn.com 9 The Woodhouse Spa Franklin hosted a grand opening on May 17 at 1175 Meridian Blvd., Ste. 100, according to Williamson Inc. and the business. The spa is part of a franchise with more than 70 locations in 20 states, according to the business’ website. The spa oŒers massages, body treatments, facials, an infrared sauna and a virtual reality meditation room with antigravity chairs. 615-515-9565. http://franklin.woodhousespas.com COMING SOON 10 Bodyrok Brentwood , a pilates studio located at 782 Old Hickory Blvd., Brentwood, will open near the end of June, according to manager Kelsey

Harrigan. Bodyrok’s signature session is a 40-minute, full-body, low- impact, high-intensity workout on the Bodyrok reformer, a custom-built strength-building machine, Harrigan said. Classes are designed for all skill levels, according to Harrigan. The store operates a second location at 809 12th Ave. S., Nashville. 615-802-0166. www.bodyrok.com/studio/brentwood 11 Mitsubishi Motors North America Inc. will open a new ¢agship dealership at 1761 Galleria Blvd. in the former space of Pier One Imports at CoolSprings Galleria on Aug. 1, according to Lauren Ryan, communications and event director for Mitsubishi Motors North America Inc. The company originally planned to open the dealership July 1. www.mitsubishi.com RELOCATION 12 Made in TN , a store specializing in selling Tennessee-produced specialty products and souvenirs, will relocate in June into a bigger space within the Factory at Franklin at 230 Franklin Road, according to co-owner Sarah Pounders. The new location is in Suite 12E, inside Liberty Hall at the Factory at Franklin, Pounders said. A grand opening celebration is scheduled for 11 a.m.-2 p.m. June 18, Pounders said. The store also sells “ready to go” boxes of Tennessee-related merchandise. The new space will roughly triple the business’ footprint to 1,000 square feet, allowing the store to oŒer a wider variety of products, Pounders said. The store opened in November 2017. 615-540-6997. www.shopmadeintn.com

Studio Bank, a local bank founded in 2018, will open a new 10,000-square foot oce called HQ2 this summer at 1550 West McEwen Drive in Cool Springs.

COURTESY STUDIO BANK

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Studio Bank , a bank founded in Nashville in 2018, plans to open a new corporate oce and retail branch at 1550 W. McEwen Drive, Franklin, in June or July, according to an announcement. The new oce, which the announcement called “HQ2,” will include more than 10,000 square feet and an initial sta† of 35 mortgage and retail bankers as well as other sta†, according to Studio Bank ocials. ANNIVERSARIES 13 Caliente Contouring Cool Springs , located in Salon Boutique at 4107 Mallory Lane, Ste. 149, Franklin, will celebrate its ¡rst anniversary in town on June 7, according to owner Claire Dean. The business oŒers fat-reduction and body-sculpting services using heated ¡liform needles to reduce fat without any downtime, according to Dean. 615-246-7108. www.calientecontouring.com/ cool-springs-tn 14 Kousouli Chiropractic Health & Wellness Inc. , a holistic health care business, celebrated its ¡rst anniversary at 198 E. Main St., Ste. 204, in Franklin on May 1, according to co-owner

The bank has grown more quickly than expected, according to the news release, and achieved pro‹tability in 2020. The bank had $662 million in assets as of March 31, according to the release. https://studiobank.com

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Paving the way to enhancing the science of non-surgical, holistic symptom relief from Nerve Pain. collaboration, according to its website. The store also has a cafe attached to its market space featuring hot and cold coŒee drinks and teas. 615-628-8253. www.onyxandalabaster.com and chiropractor Theodore Kousouli. Services include chiropractic alignment, hypnotherapy, homeopathy and wellness coaching, according to Kousouli. Hours are Monday-Saturday by appointment. 615-435-3643. www.drkousouli.com 15 Design studio and home goods shop Onyx & Alabaster is celebrating its ¡rst anniversary at 234 Public Square, Franklin, in June. The business is a home market with decor items and furniture, and also oŒers interior design services, such as furniture selection, design concepts and contractor

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

TODO LIST

June, July & August events

COMPILED BY MARTIN CASSIDY

LIVE MUSIC FirstBank Amphitheater 4525 Graystone Quarry Lane, Franklin 615-544-6154 www.rstbankamphitheater.com JULY 13 Steely Dan 14 Big Time Rush 19 Josh Groban 26 Why Don’t We 27 Third Eye Blind 28 Cody Johnson AUGUST 02 All This Future Summer Festival Tour, featuring Hillsong United 09 “Encanto”: The Sing Along Film Concert 25 Jamey Johnson with special guests Blackberry Smoke and Megan Moroney

JUNE 17 , 24 AND JULY 15

Franklin. 615-786-0186., ext. 2524. www.wcpactn.com 29 PAINT A PET PORTRAIT Artist Joan Wilkes will teach a class on painting pet portraits in the crafts room of the Franklin Recreation Complex. The class is oœered through the Williamson County Department of Parks and Recreation, and it is recommended for those age 11 and a half years old and older. Participants will produce a 9 x 12 inch canvas painting of their pet. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $30. 1120 Hillsboro Road, Franklin. 615-790-5719. www.wcparksandrec.com JULY 04 CELEBRATE INDEPENDENCE DAY IN FRANKLIN The annual Franklin on the Fourth celebration in Franklin Public Square will include art, street food, craft vendors and more. The event is held by city of Franklin and the Franklin Lions Club. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free (admission). Franklin Public Square at Main Street, Franklin. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov 04 SEE FIREWORKS AT HARLINSDALE FARM The city of Franklin will present an Independence Day reworks show

SEE A MOVIE UNDER THE STARS The Franklin Movies in the Park series will screen lms Friday nights in June and July in Pinkerton Park. Films in the series include “Stuart Little,” “Monsters Inc.” and the “The Princess Diaries”. Food trucks will be on-site. Movies will begin at 8 p.m. or sunset. Free (admission). 405 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin. www.franklintn.gov 17 TAKE A FAMILY HIKE IN NATURE The Owl’s Hill Nature Sanctuary will host a Family Fire‹y Hike, during which children will be taught about the wonders of nature after dark, including how owls hunt and why re‹ies glow. The event includes an easy hike over mostly ‹at ground. 6:30-8 p.m. $25 (adult-child pair), $15 (each additional adult), $10 (each additional child). 545 Beech Creek Road S., Brentwood. 615-370-4672. www.owlshill.org 19 ENJOY A JAMES TAYLOR TRIBUTE BAND PERFORMANCE Sweet Baby James-The James Taylor Tribute-will perform at the Williamson County Performing Arts Center at Academy Park. 7 p.m. $22.50 (adults), $20 (seniors and children). 112 Everbright Ave.,

JULY 04

RED WHITE & BOOM CROCKETT PARK

The city of Brentwood will continue its summer concert series as part of its annual “Red White & Boom” event in Crockett Park. Food trucks will be available at 6 p.m., and The Smoking Section band will play at 7 p.m. followed by reworks at 9 p.m. 6-10 p.m. Free (admission). 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov (Courtesy city of Brentwood) with live music, concessions and more at Harlinsdale Farm. The Friends of Franklin Parks, a nonpro t, will host musical performances, food and games for children in the farm’s Tractor Supply Co. Arena. Fireworks begin at 9. 5-9:30 p.m. Free (admission). 239 Franklin Road, Franklin. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov

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Find more or submit Franklin and Brentwood events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

COMPILED BY MARTIN CASSIDY

ONGOING PROJECT

will come from both the city’s capital projects fund and federal Transportation Alternatives Grant. Timeline: fall 2022-late 2023 Cost: $3.03 million Funding sources: city of Franklin, federal grant ($2 million) 2 West Main Street bridge widening Work will begin early next year to extend the West Main Street bridge over Sharps Branch to allow for the construction of a sidewalk along the north side of the road, according to Jonathan Marston, Franklin’s assistant director of engineering. The new sidewalk section will allow pedestrians to safely cross the stream without walking in the travel lanes, according to project information. City sta› are currently in the right-of-way acquisition phase to acquire easements to complete the work, according to Marston. The work also includes Middle Tennessee Electric relocating some utility poles and overhead electric lines to accommodate the project, which will also require easements, according to Marston. The city expects the project to start early next year. Timeline: early 2023-late 2023 Cost: $770,000 Funding source: city of Franklin

THE PARK AT HARLINSDALE FARM

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3 Franklin Road improvements and streetscape Work continues to improve Franklin Road— from the north end of the Harpeth River bridge to just north of Harpeth Industrial Court near downtown Franklin, accord- ing to Marston. The work will widen the stretch from two to three lanes with curb, gutter and sidewalks on both sides of the street. Other work includes bike lanes; re- vamped trac signal equipment; upgrade and replacement of underground electric and telephone, cable, and ber-optic infrastructure; and water, sanitary sewer and natural gas lines, according to city of- cials. Work will also add similarly styled street lamps to Hillsboro Road, according to Marston. Timeline: June 2020-fall 2022 Cost: $18.17 million Funding source: city of Franklin

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FUTURE PROJECTS 1 Harlinsdale Farm Bridge & Greenway This fall, Franklin will start building a pedestrian bridge over the Harpeth River that will connect the existing trail system on the northwest side of the Harpeth River to The Park at Harlinsdale Farm, according to city ocials. Future N S B L V D .

phases will include a multiuse trail from the new bridge to the existing parking lots within the park and a new trail link to a trail system within the Chestnut Bend subdivision, both on city-owned property between the new bridge and Joel Cheek Boulevard. The Chestnut Bend link is being built in partnership with the nonprot Friends of Franklin Parks, according to city ocials. Project funding N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF MAY 26. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS”COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

EDUCATION

Franklin Special School District marks completion of new performing arts center and gymnasium

BY MARTIN CASSIDY

Grove Middle School. The facility includes 480 bleacher seats, multiple locker rooms, o‘ces and a dedicated concessions area. “This is an important facility to provide enough space for physical education and sports activities,” Director of Schools David Snowden said. The building also includes the Legacy Gallery, a 650-square-foot

exhibit that showcases the district’s 116-year history. The exhibit has an interactive touch display table including interviews of former faculty and historic summaries. “It is moving to see people here being reminded of the district’s legacy,” Janet Cochran, the former principal of Johnson Elementary School said.

The Franklin Special School District on May 20 celebrated the completion of a new $15.9 million performing arts center for districtwide use and a new gym for Poplar Grove Elementary School students. More than a hundred people gathered for an afternoon ribbon cutting of the FSSD Performing Arts Center and the new gym, both at the northern end of the Poplar Grove campus at 2959 Del Rio Pike, Franklin. Current and former faculty, district students, and community and school board members toured the facilities after a brief ceremony. The opening of the district’s performing arts center will provide a much-improved venue for student musicians and actors to hone their skills as performers, board member Tim Stillings said. “Singers, songwriters, musicians, actors, aspiring public speakers….” Stillings said. “This is your space for your creative development. Use it now to one day astound us.” The 34,400-square-foot performing arts center includes a 484-seat auditorium for performances by students in band, choir and theater programs in the district’s eight schools serving grades K-8, o‘cials said. The auditorium also includes a 49-foot ’y loft and auxiliary spaces, such as changing rooms and prop storage areas. At the event, Janice Shelby, who served as the district’s director of schools from 1996-2001, said the FSSD has placed a long-standing emphasis on teaching “the whole child”. Shelby said in the 1990s, the FSSD was the –rst district in Williamson County to o˜er all students music, art and physical education. “I think it speaks to the commitment of the Franklin Special School District to excellence in learning,” Shelby said. The new 22,800-square-foot gym for Poplar Grove Elementary School will give that school its own sports space after sharing a gym with Poplar

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Members of the Franklin Special School District board cut the ribbon on a new performing arts center. (Photos by Martin Cassidy/Community Impact Newspaper)

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The Franklin Special School District Performing Arts Center includes an exhibit on the district’s 116-year history featuring an interactive table.

PRIVACY – Your privacy is important to us. For additional information as to Hometown’s privacy policies, including a description of what information we collect about consumers and customers, with whom we share such information, how such information is safeguarded, and an explanation as to your right to say no to the sharing of certain information, please visit the following link: https://htlenders.com/pages/legal CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE – The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments to it are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. Sections 2510 – 2521, and is legally privileged and confidential. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately of that fact by return e-mail and permanently delete the e-mail and any attachments to it. VIRUS DISCLAIMER: Although the sender attempts to scan e-mail and attachments for viruses, it does not guarantee that either are virus-free and accepts no liability for any damage sustained as a result of viruses. Visit htlenders.com/pages/hometown-lenders- statement-regarding-covid-19 for details about our commitment during COVID-19. ADVERTISEMENT | 1-888-628-1414 | A division of Hometown Lenders, Inc., an Equal Housing Lender NMLS# 65084 (www. nmlsconsumeraccess.org) | Terms, conditions, and restrictions may apply. Loan products are subject to availability and credit approval. Not a commitment to extend credit. Hometown Lenders USA AZ BK- 0949142. Licensed by the Department of Financial Protection & Innovation under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act 41DBO-60614

Madison Garey, 15, plays the piano in the Franklin Special School District’s new performing arts center.

FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 2959 Del Rio Pike, Franklin www.fssd.org

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BOYD MILL AVE.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY & COUNTY

News from Williamson County, Franklin & Brentwood

QUOTE OF NOTE

Franklin weighs 15.1% budget hike

Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen will meet June 14 and June 28 at 7 p.m. at 109 Third Ave. S., Franklin. Workshop meetings are at 5 p.m. In-person seating may be limited. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission will meet June 13, June 27 and July 11 at 7 p.m. at 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools Board of Education will meet June 20 at 6:30 p.m. at 1320 W. Main St., Franklin. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District Board of Education will meet June 13 at 6:30 p.m. at 2959 Del Rio Pike, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGS WE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS FRANKLIN The Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted 7-0 on May 10 to extend the vested development rights for the Aureum development on the southeast corner of East McEwen Drive and Carothers Parkway. SouthStarLLC, the developer of the project, expects to have a site plan approved by the Franklin Municipal Planning Commission by the end of June, said Ralph Knauss, executive vice president of SouthStarLLC, after the vote. SouthStarLLC plans to begin building about 350 multifamily units in 2023. WILLIAMSON COUNTY The Williamson County Commission voted 23-0 May 9 to appropriate $6 million of the county’s American Rescue Plan Act funds to an expansion of the emergency department of the Williamson County Medical Center. District 6 Commissioner Paul Webb, who is overseeing the county’s ARPA funds, said the plans to expand the department’s overall intensive care unit space and add other capacity –t the criteria for the funds of improving public access to health care. “This addition to the emergency department also includes mental health areas, which is an emphasis of ARPA ,” Webb said. “THE CITY OF FRANKLIN IS AS STABLE AS IT GETS.” MICHAEL WALTERS YOUNG, FRANKLIN’S CITY BUDGET AND ANALYTICS MANAGER, ON THE CITY’S SALES TAX REVENUE AND FINANCIAL POSITION

BY MARTIN CASSIDY

Franklin Town Hall, 109 Third Ave. S., Franklin. The $207.02 million is 15.1% higher than the FY 2021-22 budget of $179.9 million, according to city ošcials. In a city news release, City Administrator Eric Stuckey noted private investments of $556 million in Franklin during 2021 and cash reserves of $31.3 million as highlights. “Despite unprecedented economic challenges, the city of Franklin is in excellent nancial condition,” Stuckey said. “Our reserves are at strong levels and our tax rates are among the lowest in the state.” Under the proposal, the city’s property tax rate would remain $0.3261 per $100 valuation. The budget includes a 5% increase in pay grades for city employees in July, 13 new positions, and new performance measures for each department, according to the city.

FRANKLIN The city of Franklin on May 9 released the city’s $207.02 million proposed scal year 2022-23 budget, which is expected to keep the local property tax rate at. The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen is expected to take a nal vote on the budget at the regular meeting at 7 p.m. on June 28 at

A NEW LEVEL OF PUBLIC GOLF IN FRANKLIN

BUDGET PLAN

Faster Pace of Play

Franklin’s Board of Mayor and Aldermen is expected to vote on the FY-2022-23 budget on June 28.

The budget includes: • Total spending: $207.02M • Increase in employee health premiums: 5% • General pay increase of 5% SOURCE: CITY OF FRANKLINŠ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2nd largest putting green in Tennessee

Expanded Driving Range Summer, 2022

Brentwood to incorporate 206 acres into city

Local FAMILY Ownership

BY MARTIN CASSIDY

unanimously to rezone much of the land as an open space residential development zone, which allows greater exibility in designing subdivisions. City Manager Kirk Bednar said the action to add the land was at the request of the six land owners.

BRENTWOOD The Brentwood City Commission voted 7-0 on May 23 to annex 206.3 acres near the city’s western border with Nolensville where residential development is planned. The commission also voted Franklin chooses Hill LLC to develop aordable housing

NEW PAR TH HOLE

Aordable units The Hill LLC will develop aœordable housing downtown. Details include:

96

Price range between $275,000-$375,000

BY MARTIN CASSIDY

65

431

FORREST CROSSING NEIGHBORHOOD

FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted 7-0 on May 24 to approve the transfer of property at 403 and 405 Fifth Ave. N., Franklin, to the Hill LLC, a partnership of local nonprots that plan to develop the site into a’ordable and workforce housing. The Hill LLC plans to build 39 three-bedroom townhomes with a price range of $275,000-$375,000 on the 4-acre site, said Derwin Jackson, Franklin Housing Authority president and CEO. The land is valued at

39 three-bedroom townhomes

50-year deed restriction limiting sales price and household income

RIVERVIEW DRIVE FRANKLIN, TN ( ) – FRANKLINBRIDGEGOLF.COM

SOURCE: CITY OF FRANKLIN£ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

@FRANKLINBRIDGEGC

$1.23 million by the city. The Hill LLC includes the Franklin Housing Authority, the Hard Bargain Association and three other area nonprots that focus on new a’ordable housing development.

9

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

You’re never too old to hear

Contact your local rep, Christine Pett!

[email protected]

314 475 0055

With Cochlear, there are even more possibilities for a lifetime of hearing. Cochlear has hearing implant solutions for many types of hearing loss, including high frequency hearing loss, moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss and single-sided deafness.

“Working was a great challenge for me because I had a hard time hearing customers. I got implanted and I could hear papers shuing in the room. I can hear 360 again. I can hear everywhere around me. My employees noticed a huge di erence right away. I wish I had addressed this hearing issue several years ago.” Doug – Cochlear ™ Osia ® Recipient

Please seek advice from your health professional about treatments for hearing loss. Outcomes may vary, and your health professional will advise you about the factors which could aect your outcome. Always read the instructions for use. Not all products are available in all countries. Please contact your local Cochlear representative for product information. Views expressed are those of the individual. Consult your health professional to determine if you are a candidate for Cochlear technology. ©Cochlear Limited 2022. All rights reserved. Hear now. And always and other trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of Cochlear Limited or Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions AB. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. CAM-MK-PR-583 ISS1 JAN22

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2022

HEALTH CARE EDITION

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

As the global leader in implantable hearing solutions, Cochlear has provided more than 600,000 implantable devices – more than any other company – helping people of all ages to hear and connect with life’s opportunities. We understand that it can be frustrating when you struggle to hear and communicate, even with hearing aids. Cochlear has hearing implant solutions for many types of hearing loss, including high frequency hearing loss, moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss and single-sided deafness. Hearing aids help many people by making the sounds they hear louder. Unfortunately, as hearing loss progresses, sounds need to not only be made louder, they need to be made clearer. Hearing implants may be the solution you are looking for to hear more clearly, regain your independence and connect with people you love.

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

Local health care data and information

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

2022 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 95 COUNTIES

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH These rankings of all counties statewide are updated annually but include data from previous years. The factors listed are not comprehensive.

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

• LENGTH OF LIFE • QUALITY OF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

HEALTH OUTCOMES

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

13 10

4 3 6

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Length of life Overall

DAVIDSON COUNTY WILLIAMSON COUNTY RUTHERFORD COUNTY

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol- impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

8

Quality of life HEALTH FACTORS

4 16 17 34 74

8 6

Overall

Health behaviors

12

Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

3

62

80

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG— COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRACKING VACCINATIONS COUNTY VACCINATIONS BY WEEK 50,000

Williamson County saw a peak in vaccinations in early 2021, followed by a spike in spring 2022. Data is up to date as of May 18.

PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTS AGE 5+ FULLY VACCINATED Williamson County

POPULATION BY AGE WITH AT LEAST ONE DOSE

22% 51.4% 53.5% 51.9% 65% 69.8% 74.4% 83.3% 88.8% 85.9%

34.1% 65.9% 71.2% 73.3% 76.9% 78.9% 82.6% 90.2% 97.3% 92%

33.4% 63.3% 61.4% 74.7% 77.7% 82.5% 81.7% 84.4% 89.2% 83.9%

Peak

5-11 12-15

18,946 03/24/2021 15,841 03/24/2021 44,632 04/14/2021

65.12%

40,000

16-20 21-30 31-40 41-50 51-60 61-70 71-80

Rutherford County

30,000

52.39%

Davidson County

20,000

62.43%

State average

10,000

50.9%

0

SOURCE: TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH—COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

81+

2020

2021

2022

11

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

Get back to your roots of living Wild & Well #1 Supplement & wellness store in Tennessee Educational classes • Educated staff

$20 OFF $100 OR MORE CODE “WILD” USE ONLINE OR IN STORE VALID ONE TIME ONLY www.daniwilliamson.com

#Shoplocal #Womanowned #Supportlocal #StayWild&Well 330 Mallory Station Road Suite B3, Franklin, TN 37067 [email protected] | 615-953-8300

No matter what part of town you’re in, we’re nearby. Sleep like a baby Fertility treatments Andrology Endocrinology Genetics IVF laboratory services

Also known as Cool Smiles DDS We are joining the Tennessee Family Dental Care team to bring comfortable, affordable care to our patients!

PROVIDING FRIENDLY, AFFORDABLE DENTAL CARE!

Adult Complete Exam $ 99

Children’s Complete Checkup $ 49

Emergency Exam

$ 49 Call or visit our website to schedule your next exam www.tennesseefamilydentalcare.com Two Convenient Locations to serve you

NOW WITH 3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

Nashville 345 23rd Ave. N., Ste. 401 Nashville, TN 37203

Franklin 4601 Carothers Pkwy, Ste. 325 Franklin, TN 37067

Murfreesboro 1725 Medical Center Pkwy, Ste. 200 Murfreesboro, TN 37129

 

To learn more today call 615-321-4740 or visit www.nashvillefertility.com

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CLINICS & ERS

Information on hospitals, local ERs, urgent cares & retail clinics

6

12

KEY O‹ers COVID19 testing T Hospitals

Retail clinic R

Walk-in clinic W

Urgent care center U

O‹ers COVID19 vaccines V

O‹ers Œu vaccines F

4 TriStar Southern Hills Medical Center Trauma level: N/A NICU level: N/A Total number of employees: 495 Total number of beds: 126 Notable programs and specialties: chest pain; joint and spine and stroke centers 391 Wallace Road, Nashville 615 781 4000 www.tristarhealth.com 5 Vanderbilt University Medical Center Trauma level: I NICU level: IV Total number of employees: 24,039 Total number of beds: 1,175 Notable programs and specialties: Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Eye 615 322 5000 www.vumc.org 6 Williamson Medical Center Trauma level: N/A NICU level: IIB Total number of employees: 1,900-plus Total number of beds: 200-plus Notable programs and specialties: 825 providers in 70 specialties and sub-specialties; accredited breath health center; obstetrics; comprehensive 24-hour adult and pediatric emergency care 4321 Carothers Parkway, Franklin 615 435 5000 www.williamsonmedicalcenter.com CLINICS & URGENT CARES Franklin 7 Ascension Saint Thomas Urgent Care U W T F 509 Hillsboro Road 615 472 2139 www.urgentteam.com Institute, Psychiatric Hospital 1211 Medical Center Drive, Nashville

COMPILED BY MARTIN CASSIDY

HOSPITALS 1 Ascension St. Thomas-Midtown Trauma level: N/A NICU level: III Total number of employees: 2,200-plus Total number of beds: 683 Notable programs and specialties: Joint Commission-certied advanced primary stroke center, Joint Commission- Certied advanced chest pain center, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, comprehensive women’s care, Cancer Center, orthopedics and spine center, www.healthcare.ascension.org 2 Ascension Saint Thomas Hospital West Trauma level: N/A NICU level: N/A Total number of employees: 1,300-plus Total number of beds: 541 Notable programs and specialties: Heart and vascular care, heart and kidney transplant services, Joint Commission- certied comprehensive stroke center, cancer care, neurology, neurosurgery 4220 Harding Pike, Nashville 615 222 2111 www.healthcare.ascension.org 3 Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital Trauma level: I NICU level: IV Total number of employees: 3,200-plus Total number of beds: 343 Notable programs and specialties: cancer, transplant, trauma, sickle cell disease, developmental disorders 2200 Children’s Way, Nashville 615 936 1000 www.childrenshospitalvanderbilt.org heart and vascular care 2000 Church St., Nashville 615 284 5555

Williamson Medical Center

Physicians Urgent Care

PHOTOS BY MARTIN CASSIDYšCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

8 CareNow Urgent Care U W T F 2017 Mallory Lane 615 656 3239 www.carenow.com 9 CVS Minute Clinic R T V F 1154 Liberty Pike 615 791 1164 www.cvs.com/minuteclinic 10 The Little Clinic R T V F 1204 Murfreesboro Road 615 465 4600 www.thelittleclinic.com 11 The Little Clinic R T V F 3054 Columbia Ave. 615 550 0091 www.thelittleclinic.com 12 Physicians Urgent Care U W T V F 155 Covey Drive, Ste. 100 615 472 1550

1834 W. McEwen Drive, Ste. 110 615 875 4200 www.vanderbilthealth.com

15 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Franklin U W T F 919 Murfreesboro Road 615 791 7373 www.vanderbilthealth.com Brentwood 16 America’s Family Doctors & Walk-In Clinics W F 1195 Old Hickory Blvd., Ste. 103

615 373 2000 afdclinics.com 17 CareNow Urgent Care U W T F 210 Franklin Road, Ste. 4B 615 964 6160 www.carenow.com 18 Physicians Urgent Care U W V F 700 Old Hickory Lane, Ste. 207 615 457 3864 www.physiciansurgentcare.com

www.physiciansurgentcare.com 13 Physicians Urgent Care U T V F 5021 Hughes Crossing, Ste. 165 6157948877 www.physiciansurgentcare.com 14 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Cool

19 Vanderbilt Health and Williamson Medical Center Walk-in Clinic Brentwood U W T F 134 Pewitt Drive, Ste. 200 615 371 2481 www.vanderbilthealth.com NOTE: VACCINE AVAILABILITY MAY VARY BASED ON DEMAND. CALL LOCATIONS TO VERIFY AVAILABILITY. THIS LIST IS NOT COMPREHENSIVE.

Springs U W T

F

You’re Ivited To Cloverld Prk Seior Livi ‘s

Thursday, June 23 @ 4 P.M. Grand Opening A GREAT GATSBY CELEBRATION

6030 CLOVERLAND DR | BRENTWOOD, TN

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FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION • JUNE 2022

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