46 adorable dogs for adoption in Merseyside

Numerous dogs are up for adoption in Merseyside, and the charity rehoming them is looking for your help.

These are 46 of the dogs available for adoption from Dogs Trust Merseyside, based in Huyton. Since 1891 as the National Canine Defence League, and since 2003 as Dogs Trust, the UK’s leading dog welfare charity has campaigned against cruelty and helped rehome dogs.

Among the dogs in the Merseyside branch are lurchers, German shepherds and lurchers, and even a shar pei, dogue de Bordeaux and a Pomeranian. Each are full of character and looking for a new, loving home with unique requirements after their previous owners died, moved or felt unable to give dogs the time and care they need.

READ MORE:‘Perfect’ dog left tied to gate gets new home after owners spot him in ECHO

You can view all the dogs on Dogs Trust Merseyside’s website here and you can read more about adopting a dog here.

Archie

Archie the Labrador
Archie the Labrador

This 10-year-old Labrador is described as a “lovely old chap” who’s “still full of fun” and “gets along well with other dogs”. Dogs Trust said: “Archie greets everyone in a very polite but excited way, his tail goes ten to the dozen, whether it’s a stranger or someone he knows.

“Archie enjoys his walks and does his best to help you out the door by kindly thrusting his head through his harness. When out, he greets all people and dogs the same way, friendly and calmly, and he is going to make someone a wonderful best friend.

Due to his age and stiff legs, Archie can manage 25-minute walks and needs help getting into cars, which he’s used to travelling in. The fully house trained dog will signal when he wants to go out and can be left alone for couple of hours.

Dogs Trust said he appreciates a “quieter environment” and would be “more suited to living with high school age children than those younger”. Archie has some skin problems requiring medication, and has recently started a course of injections to help with it, but these are costly.

Axil

Axil the German shepherd
Axil the German shepherd

Axil is a “wonderful” young German shepherd, also known as an Alsatian, whose “favourite outlet to forget his worries” is chasing after toys. He’s able to relax when away from the kennel environment, which “he really isn’t enjoying”.

His stress “means he isn’t really able to focus well on his interactions with other dogs”, so will require ongoing training.Dogs Trust said Axil needs a home with no children and his own garden, plus “he’d love to find an experienced family who can teach him about life and take him on adventures”.

Potential adopters need to visit him multiple times at the centre to build a bond before taking him home for good. He will also require some repeat visits to Dogs Trust’s vet after adoption and can’t live in a flat due to problems with his legs.

Barney

Barney the crossbreed
Barney the crossbreed

A lively five-year-old crossbreed who’s “bursting with energy and is raring to go”, Barney is “incredibly smart and loves training”, so Dogs Trust is hoping to find a family “willing to work with him, and allow him time to settle without pushing him”.

The charity said: “When he’s not out and about, Barney is happy to lounge across the back of his sofa in a very cat like fashion. He’s an agility star too, and will often leap on the equipment and show off his skills. When Barney’s in the mood, he can be a real snuggler, and likes to be close by you, juts watching the world go by.”

Barney needs a quiet, child-free environment, with few visitors and his own garden. Although he will walk with dogs he’s had a proper introduction to, he will need to be the only dog in the home. His current training programme needs to be continued in any new home, and potential adopters need to meet him multiple times before taking him home. Full support will be given by Dogs Trust’s training and behaviour team through all stages of Barney’s adoption.

Bella

Bella the Jack Russell terrier
Bella the Jack Russell terrier

Almost two years old, Bella can be very conflicted about what she wants and needs to be adopted by someone who’ll take time to understand her and read her signs when she’s uncomfortable. The Jack Russell terrier happily travels in the car, “takes her treats like a lady”, and loves to play with toys, especially soft ones she can rip to shreds.

Dogs Trust said she barks and lunges out of fear at people passing by her kennel, but the insecure dog does form strong bonds with people over time. The charity said: “Once she’s settled into a suitable home, we’re sure she will quickly relax and feel secure again. Bella is looking for a home without children as her experiences with them haven’t always been positive. She will also need to be the only dog in the home as she lacks confidence around others.”

Biscuit

Biscuit the English bull terrier
Biscuit the English bull terrier

This “beautiful” English bull terrier “definitely lives up to her name as she is an absolute sweetie pie and just needs lots of love and affection”. Toys aren’t her cup of tea, but Biscuit wiggles her bum frantically when people approach for a cuddle. She’s been getting pushed from A to B in a pram as she doesn’t like walking on a lead, so new owners will have to build her confidence with leads. She is a little overweight, so a good diet and exercise she will be good for her.

Biscuit was brought into the kennel due to no longer getting on with the other dog in the home, so will have to be the only dog in her new home. Dogs Trust said: “While at the centre, she has been OK sniffing other dogs in a friendly manner however does just lose interest after a while. She hasn’t lived with children before however has had occasional interactions with them. We are looking for a home with any children in the home being over the age of 10.”

Bob

Bob the lurcher
Bob the lurcher

This friendly eight-year-old lurcher is affectionate, friendly and prefers human interaction to toys, happily walking up to anyone to say hello, and actively seeking out a fuss from his handlers. He loves to be outside exploring, exercising and running off lead, but he’s “a little too keen on the wildlife”, so you’ll need to watch him as he’s very quick.

A recent attack by two off-lead dogs before coming to Dogs Trust left Bob less confident around other dogs than he used to be. The charity said: “He will be better as the only pet for now, but should be allowed to say hello to well mannered dogs that he seems comfortable with. Bob is house trained and can be left alone for a couple of hours without worry, once he’s settled in. He can live with children around the age of 10.”

Bonnie

Bonnie the Belgian shepherd/Dutch herder cross
Bonnie the Belgian shepherd/Dutch herder cross

Only eight months old, this Belgian shepherd/Dutch herder cross “has a lot of potential in the right hands”. A mix of two smart and active breeds, Bonnie is loves walks, spending a lot of time sniffing, exploring, or playing fetch until she’s exhausted. She will also need mental stimulation and does seek out affection.

Largely due to a lack of socialisation, Bonnie reacts to other dogs if they come too close to her. Dogs Trust recommends “gentle and proper introductions to suitable, well-mannered friends” when her adopters have built a bond with Bonnie, and Bonnie is ready.

The charity said: “She will obviously need to be the only pet at home. She has been great with people and can live with children of high school age. Bonnie isn’t fully house trained, and she will need a home where there are no dogs in neighbouring gardens, and few in the area generally.”

Bow

Bow the bull mastiff
Bow the bull mastiff

He “may not have the face of an angel, but he has the loveliest little personality”, according to Dogs Trust. The bull mastiff was “terribly underweight” when he arrived at the Merseyside centre in 2019, but he looks a lot better now.

He’s even “a little more chunky” because he wasn’t getting regular exercise in his last home due to illness in the family. He enjoys a gentle potter about, and regular exercise will help him become, fitter, healthier and lose a few pounds.

Bow needs a family who’ll “take things very slowly with him” as he gets worried around new people and situations. He won’t live with just any dog, but he might with a well-matched one. He’s house trained, and can live with children over the age of 14.

Dogs Trust said: “Understandably, he’s going to need a few visits paying to him at the centre before he goes home. Last time he left us, he did hide upstairs in his new home for a few days, so don’t expect too much of him at the beginning, and give him the space he needs to come around.”

Buddy

Buddy the American bulldog
Buddy the American bulldog

This “superstar” American bulldog is lots of fun, incredibly friendly, gets very giddy at times, and “puts a smile on the face of everyone who meets him”. Buddy is looking for a new family since his previous owner was no longer able to meet his needs.

He loves playing games with handlers and his dog pals, and he could live with children aged 12 and above, as long as they’re not put off by his size. He can be quite vocal towards other dogs and may be best as the only pet, according to Dogs Trust, but might like some playmates that can match his play style.

The charity said: “Buddy isn’t used to being left alone, and although he is house trained, he will need someone to be at home most of the day with him. When he first came to us, Buddy had split his ear and required a lot of visits to the vet, so he’s a little wary of being touched around his head and ears.”

Buddy

Buddy the Staffordshire cross
Buddy the Staffordshire cross

You “likely won’t find a more angelic face” than that of Buddy the Staffordshire cross, who “likes to say hello to everyone”. Buddy lived one the streets with his owner for eight years, so not much phases him, but he is a little hard of hearing and is showing mild signs of dementia like occasionally getting a little confused.

The 10-year-old loves to play with toys, especially tennis balls, and he still enjoys going for a potter, even if his legs aren’t as strong as they were. He has some muscle wastage in his legs, so can’t manage long walks, but regular exercise should still be part of his daily routine.

Buddy will happily walk alongside quiet dogs, but “he does try and push his luck with the ladies”. He’s more suited and used to being the only dog at home. He is house trained, but may have an accident or two whilst he adjusts, so. He can live with children aged 10 and over, and “is going to make a wonderful companion for someone”, Dogs Trust said.

Buster

Buster the Labrador cross
Buster the Labrador cross

This Labrador cross “is the proud owner of the wiggliest bum in the centre”. The 10-year-old “glorious boy” usually runs to get his own blanket and is very active and loves to be outside. He’s used to a few walks a day and loves playing with his toys, over which he can be possessive at times, so he may be best suited to being the only dog at home.

Buster seems more comfortable with female dogs than male ones. He was easily aroused, grabbing tree branches on his walks, when he first arrived at Dogs Trust’s Merseyside centre, “but he’s settled in beautifully now, and no longer does this”.

The charity said: “We wouldn’t advise any game of that nature to be encouraged once he’s home, as his arousal could escalate quickly. He is house trained and he can live with children aged around 13. He’s not a fan of squirrels.”

Chuck

Chuck the Satffordshire cross
Chuck the Satffordshire cross

This Satffordshire cross is “the sweetest boy who is just brilliant with people” and loves walks. He hates going back to his kennel, but Dogs Trust doesn’t “anticipate this being an issue when he’s back in a home”. The charity said: “Chuck loves to be made a fuss of and is very friendly, he’ll stop happily for everyone to say hello to him. He used to love playing with toys and is showing more interest in them with each passing day.”

Chuck would make a wonderful family dog, likes to travel in the car, and can live with children aged about 10, but he doesn’t enjoy the company of other dogs, even if he will walk with them nearby. He can’t be let off lead unless in a secure area by himself. He can be left alone for a few hours he’s settled in and he is house trained.

Cinders

Cinders the greyhound
Cinders the greyhound

This “very pretty” and gentle three-year-old greyhound “is so quiet, you’d barely notice she was there”. She’s always excited to go for a walk, and she “stands perfectly still to have her harness and lead put on”. She’ll walk nicely with other calm dogs, but she never interacts with them and would be content as the only dog at home.

Quite reserved at times, Cinders “can be incredibly nervous of new people and will need a quiet home with just adults and few visitors”. Dogs Trust said: “We don’t know for certain that she hasn’t been a racing dog, but we always advise caution with sight hounds when they are around small dogs, cats and wildlife. Cinders is muzzled when walking at the centre and she seems perfectly comfortable with it.”

Daisy

Daisy the shar pei
Daisy the shar pei

Daisy’s previous owners felt she wasn’t getting enough quality time due to their working hours. The three-year-old shar pei has settled well in to the centre and likes playing with her kennel mate, but “she can be rather wary of sudden movements still”. She knows a few commands like ‘sit’ and ‘paw’, and although she loves a fuss, Daisy is less keen on formal handling like her vet check.

She prefers dogs who are on the quiet side, and following a positive mix at the centre, Dogs Trust said she could live with another dog. Daisy guards her food from other animals, so they would need to be fed separately. The charity said: “She is house trained and can live with children around the age of 10. She hasn’t lived with youngsters but did have them visit regularly. Daisy has a history of allergies and is fed on hypoallergenic food.”

Defa

Defa the crossbreed
Defa the crossbreed

This crossbreed has “grown into a very handsome chap” who’s happy to be made a fuss of in the eight years since he was first with Dogs Trust as “a teeny tiny pup”. Although he requires ongoing pain relief for arthritis, he’s is still active, loves walks on the beach, enjoys exploring new places and likes to give everywhere a thorough nosing before relaxing into playtime.

Defa seems stressed around other dogs, so would be happy as the only dog at home. Dogs Trust warned not to keep him with cats as he is known to chase them. The charity said: “He’s very friendly in general and should be fine with visitors. He is house trained but might take a little while to get used to a new routine. He’s such a lovely boy and should be fine to live with children aged 8 and over. Defa is happy to get in the car and can be left home alone for a couple of hours once he’s settled.”

Duke

Duke the German shepherd
Duke the German shepherd

This one-year-old German shepherd is a “complex chap” who “loves to be made a fuss of and gets all puppy-silly when you give him some affection”. He’s looking for his third home, and he “needs an adopter that understands his breed and can look past his good looks and youth”. The active dog needs his mind and body regularly stimulated, and has started scent work to give him a focus.

He responds “very well” to training, and Dogs Trust hopes to find him an experienced family who aren’t afraid to put some work in. Duke loves meeting new people, but he needs to learn a more polite way than his current feet-first method.

He also enjoys other dogs, but he’s “terribly rude and can be grabby”, so he needs to be the only pet at home, “with some careful introductions outside of the house”. Because he “can be quite mouthy, he isn’t suitable for living with children”, with any youngsters at home needing to be older teens.

Despite his youth, Duke is currently on a pain relief trial due to apparent pain in his elbows, which may affect him in future. Dogs Trust said: “As his training needs are quite complex and cover multiple issues, our team at the centre will be on hand throughout Duke’s adoption and beyond, making sure that everyone is getting the support they need.”

Franklin

Franklin the German shepherd
Franklin the German shepherd

Dogs Trust thinks this German shepherd is roughly four years old, but they know almost nothing about his background or why he’s so shy and nervous. He likes walks, usually with his nose to the ground, and he enjoys affection.

He panics when other dogs try to interact with him, so will need to be the only dog at home, with any new family willing to slowly work on his socialisation skills. He needs a home with an adult family, no visiting children, and “ideally people who are experienced with reactive dogs”.

Franklin’s new family would need to build up positive associations with vet visits as he got “incredibly worried” during a visit when he first arrived. He’s “currently underweight and almost inhales his food, so he should be left alone whilst eating, even once he has settled in at home”.

Fred

Fred the crossbreed
Fred the crossbreed

Fred is looking for an adults only home with no visiting children after his owners passed away. The 11-year-old crossbreed enjoys walks, is happy meeting new people and presents his bum for a good scratch. While he greets other dogs “in a well-behaved manner” while on walks, Fred isn’t keen on all dogs, so needs to be the only pet at home.

He isn’t much excited by grooming, and he doesn’t enjoy being overhandled, so he’ll let you know or walk away when he’s had enough. Dogs Trust said any new family “should slowly build up handling gradually over time to create a positive association”, which will help at the vets during examination. The “older chap” is on medication for stiff legs, and he’s “recently had a few little lumps investigated”, but the charity said they’re all fine.

Fred is house trained and, once he’s settled, can be left by himself for up to four hours, preferably in a home away from busy roads as “he doesn’t like bicycles or motorbikes”. He has been possessive of food in his bowl in the past, and he has a habit of guarding food that falls to the floor. To help, Dogs Trust is teaching Fred a ‘drop and swap’ technique, which “will need to be continued once he’s in a new home”.

Jack

Jack the Jack Russell terrier
Jack the Jack Russell terrier

Jack the Jack Russell terrier is a “complex little chap” who was quickly adopted from Dogs trust after his first owner passed away. But he struggle to settle in his new home, particularly when people knocked at the door or were by windows.

He’s settled back into the kennels at Dogs Trust, who believe he’s “noise sensitive” and said he prefers walks in quiet areas of the centre or neighbouring park. He’s “always excited to see people he’s comfortable with”, loves playing with toys, and us used to travelling in the car.

While he does prefer to play with his own toys and then interact with other dogs at the centre, he is “fairly receptive” to them, giving a “friendly sniff” before trotting off. Dogs Trust thinks he’d be happier as the only pet in an adult only home, with “some calm walking pals to go to the park with”.

Jack’s new family “must have a way of separating him from the front door when necessary”, due to his behaviour around the front door.

Jack

Jack the greyhound
Jack the greyhound

This four-year-old greyhound is “very calm and friendly”, loves getting to know life off the racetrack, and enjoys “sprawling on a duvet in his kennel”. He “will have spent his life in a kennel environment”, so needs your patience with house training.

While Jack will walk with the odd greyhound and can have “some select walking pals”, he doesn’t want to share his space and will have to be the only dog at home. Dogs Trust always advises that care is taken with ex-racers like Jack around small dogs, cats and other furries because “his natural instinct is to chase after any quick movement”. He can live with children of high school age.

Jerry

Jerry the German shepherd
Jerry the German shepherd

Jerry “has seen very little of the world” in his 10 months, having “never left the house” before arriving at the centre, so “he’s finding the wider world a little overwhelming”. Dogs Trust said: “We encourage him to investigate the centre when things are quiet so that he doesn’t get spooked, and his new family will need to do the same with new environments whilst Jerry gets used to his new life.”

The German shepherd loves mealtimes and “is very partial to hotdogs as treats”. Jerry as is also taking an interest in tennis balls, “but isn’t quite sure what he’s meant to do with them just yet”. He’s “very affectionate and just adores his main handler, Sam, often trying to climb on her knee”. Any adopters need to visit him at the centre several times to begin building a bond before taking him home.

An ideal home for Jerry would be in a quiet area without too many dogs around as he is “concerned” around them, reacting to some and being friendly to others. Although he shared his kennel with his sister, Dogs Trust doesn’t feel he’s ready “to share a space with an unfamiliar dog just yet”. Any children in his new home will need to be 15 and over, and he’ll likely need help with house training, and for someone to be at home most of the time.

Jimmy

Jimmy the Patterdale terrier
Jimmy the Patterdale terrier

This “active chap”, who Dogs Trust think might be nine years old, is independent, enjoys wandering around the centre, and “likes to do things on his own terms”. The Patterdale terrier’s previous owners felt it unfair to leave him alone for 12 hours a day, so Dogs Trust is looking for new home where he can be the only dog in the house, “as he can be vocal towards some”.

Jimmy can live with children over the age of 14 “as he’d like a quiet life”. He is house trained, and he sleeps for much of the day, but jumps up when he sees someone with his lead for a walk. He particular favours Dogs Trust volunteers who “might have some tasty treats”.

Jorah

Jorah the Staffordshire bull terrier
Jorah the Staffordshire bull terrier

Jorah the “gorgeous golden oldie” has “the biggest contagious smile” and loves rides in the car. The house trained Staffordshire bull terrier loves getting out, meeting new people and letting them make a fuss of him. He “really likes playing tug with his favourite people and generally lapping up any attention”.

Due to his age, he “has some tenderness in his back legs that may require pain relief in the future”. He’s not keen on being handled in that area just now, and Dogs Trust thinks “he would be best in a home where any children are older teenagers rather than youngsters”. He doesn’t care for the company of other dogs, doesn’t enjoy when they get close to his face, and he gets over aroused by them, pulling when he sees them, so he needs to be the only pet.

Lexi

Lexi the Staffordshire bull terrier
Lexi the Staffordshire bull terrier

Lexi was almost “put to sleep for not getting along with a new puppy”, but thanks the vet’s intervention, the Staffordshire bull terrier is with Dogs Trust and looking for home where she can be the only dog. Because she’s nervous and her experience around children is unknown, any kids in the house trained dog’s new home must be 14 and over.

She’s “a little worried about being handled”, and needs her new family to be ‘hands off’ she’s comfortable with them, but she loves seeing her handlers each morning and loves doing “some fun training exercises” with them. Dogs Trust said: “We can tell that Lexi loves toys but she isn’t relaxed enough to play with them yet, but when she settles this will be a great way to build a bond with her.

The charity said Lexi is “is reported to be wary of men” and, although this hasn’t been seen during her stay at the centre, “it is still something to bear in mind as she may be a little more assertive when she relaxes”. She’s also wary of other dogs, with Dogs Trust saying: “We know she is uncomfortable around other dogs and she will turn to her handler for comfort if they are around. If other dogs come to close to her, Lexi will make her feelings very clear.”

Lola

Lola the Pomeranian
Lola the Pomeranian

Lola is a “typically affectionate” Pomeranian who “likes to lean in for a cuddle” once she knows you. She’s “can be worried about being handled, particularly at the vets where she has to wear a muzzle”, and she’s not quite ready yet for her handlers to put a harness.

Dogs Trust said she “needs a family that will look past her breed and obvious appearance, and who understands that there’s a complex little lady underneath”. She “walks nicely on her lead until she sees another dog” and barks and lunges at them.

The charity advised walking her at quiet times, alongside focus training so she learns “her handlers are more interesting”. Due to her nervous nature, Dogs Trust doesn’t believe Lola is suitable for living with children, “so all family members resident and visiting will need to be over the age of 16”.

May

May the German shepherd cross
May the German shepherd cross

This “very pretty young” Collie and German shepherd cross has “a sweet personality”, is great with people, loves to give and receive affection. She’s looking for a home with no other dogs, “ideally in a neighbourhood that doesn’t have too many” of them, as she doesn’t like their company and “will show her dislike if they try to approach”.

May “absolutely adores playing with toys, especially tennis balls and soft toys”. Dogs Trust has no history for her, so doesn’t know how she came to be straying, so it “cannot say whether she is fully house trained and she can live with children over the age of 12”. The charity said: “May does not seem to have had any basic training.”

Miley

Miley the Staffordshire bull terrier
Miley the Staffordshire bull terrier

Nicknamed “Smiley Miley”, this Staffordshire bull terrier arrived at Dogs Trust after her family were forced to move. The 12-year-old is looking for “a new retirement home” now she’s been given the all clear following surgery to remove tumours after lumps of concern were found.

Miley is “a little slower these days” but still enjoys walks and loves to be made a fuss of, especially with a tickle under the chin. Miley doesn’t like cats, and is wary of other dogs since being attacked by a large dog a few years ago. She’d be happiest as the only pet in the home, but “will happily walk with other dogs once she’s been properly introduced”.

Dogs Trust said: “She’s fine to live with children aged 10 and above, but she’s looking for a quiet life these days. She is perfectly house trained and is going to bring so much joy to someone’s life.”

Milo

Milo the American bulldog
Milo the American bulldog

This “very happy” three-year-old Staffy American bulldog cross loves going for walks and is “is always interested in everything that’s going on around him”. He “loves to be made a fuss of” and “is even happy when he’s being brushed”, but he tends to greet people with his front feet, which Dogs Trust is trying to discourage.

He’d benefit from mental stimulation like puzzle feeders as well as physical stimulation. Milo would be best suited to a home where he’s the only dog, with “plenty of friends of a similar nature for walking with”. He loves other dogs, pulling to get to them, “but he is a bit much for most” and “not everyone appreciates having him suddenly appear in their face”.

Dogs Trust said: “Milo is house trained and can be left alone for a few hours. He needs an eye keeping on him in hot weather as he’s not a big fan and is known to go off his food in the heat. He can live with children of high school age.”

Milo

Milo the lurcher
Milo the lurcher

This “active and affectionate” early riser “likes everyone to be up at 6am sharp for walkies”. He loves belly rubs and swimming, lounging on the couch watching TV, and, favourite, playing tuggy with his humans. Milo “travels happily in the car, watching all the traffic out of the windows”.

He was with Dogs Trust previously but “was returned due to an incident with another dog”. The four-year-old lurcher needs to be the only dog in the house, ideally an area with few dogs. The “smart boy” knows some basic commands, and “learning to focus around other dogs would be beneficial for him”. Dogs Trust said: “He’s still young at four years, so he has lots of potential to learn and grow.”

Milo, who is house trained, can live with children aged 12 and over, and he has been used to being left for a couple of hours. He is terrified of fireworks, so “some preparations must be made before Bonfire Night and New Year.”

Nala

Nala the Belgian shepherd
Nala the Belgian shepherd

Sweet and affectionate Nala gives “a little song and a happy dance” when she sees her carers, who she “bonded very quickly” with. The Belgian shepherd is “a bright girl who has had some basic training in the past” and needs someone “willing to put in some extra training”.

Food is the best way of introducing her to new people, and although she can be worried around strangers, “after one meet she is your best friend”. She was attacked by another dog a couple of years ago, so she finds them worrying and can be vocal towards them. Dogs Trust said: “She will need to be the only dog in the home but has previously lived with a cat.”

Due to her sensitive nature, Nala is best suited to “any children in the household or visiting to be of upper high school age”. She is house trained and can be left for a few hours at a time once she’s settled into the new home. Any adopters need to meet her a few times at the centre to build a bond, and so Dogs Trust’s training team can “go through how best to introduce her to new people as well as dog socialisation”.

Oliver

Oliver the greyhound
Oliver the greyhound

One of three greyhounds at Dogs Trust Merseyside who were “found living in poor conditions” in a field, Oliver is “by far the most outgoing and confident of the trio and simply oozes charm as he struts around the centre making friends with everyone”. Roughly one years old, he hurls himself into his handlers’ arms, so they’re teaching him “feet on the floor is much more polite”.

With no problems being handled, Oliver seems to revel in the attention. He interested in chasing toys but isn’t sure what to do with them when he catches up with one. Dogs Trust said: “He would suit an active family who are willing to put some time in to some basic training with him.”

The charity believes he’s never been inside a house and is highly unlikely to be house trained, so will need time to adjust, “as he may find such a big change to be overwhelming, so don’t expect too much of him too soon”. Oliver has been great with other dogs at the centre, which said “he should be kept socialised once he is home”. He can live with another well matched dog, and should be fine to live with children around the age of 10.

Patch

Patch the English springer
Patch the English springer

Patch is a “sensitive soul” looking for a “special home”. He can get overwhelmed and spends most of the day inside his kennel, “but he is adapting to new experiences well”. The English springer is friendly with people, but “he must be allowed to approach them” instead of them approaching him.

He enjoys his walks, but prefers when it’s quiet, as he hates noisy environments. Patch is “visibly much more comfortable and settled” once he builds a bond with someone. Dogs Trust said: “He’s happy to be handled by people he knows and looks to his handlers when in a situation such as a vet exam.”

Patch loves his toys, but “has a tendency to pinch household items”, which may be because he lacked appropriate toys as a young dog. He slept on an armchair instead of a bed as a puppy and “has never taken to traditional dog beds when offered”, so his previous owner allowed him the sleep on a sofa, which he became protective of. Dogs Trust is working on a “drop” cue so they can trade toys with him, and on “being rewarded for getting down from the sofa he has in his kennel when asked”.

Adopters will need to continue some training with these things once Patch is taken home after a few visits to him at the centre, and a one-to-one meeting with its training team. Dogs Trust said: “When it comes to other dogs, Patch is quite reactive, although he has been brilliant in the past. It’s possible that the time of day in which he has been walked left him little exposure to other dogs, particularly during the lockdown of the last two years. Again, we are working on this.”

Peggy

Peggy the German shepherd
Peggy the German shepherd

This young German shepherd is “looking for a new home ideally with people who know” the breed. “curious” dog is “very wary of any new surroundings and situations, but she is settling more each day”. Dogs Trust said: “As long as her adopters take things slowly with her and don’t rush anything, Peggy should settle in beautifully. She likes to play with toys and will bring them back on occasion, and this is a great way to build a bond with Peggy.”

Peggy gets worried when dogs approach, and will sometimes flash her teeth at them, so needs to be the only dog at home, with gentle socialisation too. The best way to start is walking with dogs at a distance. She “has had a good basis with training and knows a few simple commands”, and as shepherds are smart, she can pick things up quickly.

Dogs Trust said: “She can live with children aged about 14 and over, and she is used to having someone at home all day. If she is left for too long, your neighbours will not thank you. She will need multiple visits to her at the centre as she can be nervous of new people.”

Pixie

Pixie the crossbreed
Pixie the crossbreed

This shy and smart crossbreed comes around when given time and patience. Pixie is “happy on her walks and loves attention from her carers, and is becoming more comfortable with being approached by people”. She gives her handlers “a lovely sit”, and “some positive training will help keep her switched on, as well as physically active”.

Pixie is lively and needs plenty of daily exercise. She’s interested in other dogs and is unsure how to behave around them, tending to approach before launching into “a mad dash about. She’s looking for an adult only home where she is the only dog and can find her feet, with “some gentle and correct socialisation outside the house”. Potential adopters need to meet Pixie a few times at the centre to build a bond before taking her home.

Dogs Trust said: “Pixie can be very snatchy with treats and is very food driven. Although this is great for training, she will need to be gently discouraged from helping herself, and keep an eye on what you leave on the kitchen worktops.”

Puma

Puma the greyhound
Puma the greyhound

A “calm” three-year-old who “who happily sits on a duvet in his kennel, watching the world go by”, this greyhound leans into his handlers if they “stand still for more than two seconds”. The friendly lad approaches people confidently when he’s on walks, and he “absolutely loves toys, especially tennis balls as he can pick them up and run around with them”.

Puma “is great with other Greyhounds, particularly the girls, but is avoidant of other breeds”. Dogs Trust said: “He could live with another Greyhound but meeting any other breeds will require some development in his social skills. As Puma has spent his life in a kennel environment, it may be that he is not house trained. He can live with children of high school age.”

Rambler

Rambler the foxhound
Rambler the foxhound

“Handsome” foxhound Rambler “likes mixing with the other dogs and meeting people, and exploring the grounds in a proper Hound style”. The seven-year-old is “very easy going” and “would do well with a family who has some experience of hounds or working dogs, so that he can reach his full potential”.

He gets along with other dogs and usually walks with anyone, but isn’t certain how to interact with male dogs. Rambler is “typically hound-noisy when he is out walking, especially when he sees another dog and wants to get to them”. The house trained dog likes to be left alone when eating or lying in his bed, “so any children in the home will need to be of high school age and understand this”. He can be destructive if separated from his family overnight.

A densely populated residential area might not be ideal for Rambler given he loves “the sound of his own voice when he gets excited”. Dogs Trust said: “He is a fabulous chap with a wonderful character and we know his new family will be very lucky to have him when they meet him. If you would like to adopt him, please get in touch.”

Reggie

Reggie the French bulldog
Reggie the French bulldog

Reggie is “quite a complex” dog who wasn’t getting along with the other dog in his home. The French bulldog is “very affectionate when he’s comfortable with you, and likes to lean in for a fuss, even jumping onto your lap for maximum cuddling”.

He enjoys walks and saying hello to other dogs, but he’s “happier when he gets to meet people on a walk rather than by his kennel, as this can make him a little anxious.” Reggie gets stressed about vet visits and becomes stressed, so he need a family willing to “take their time with him and not push him into anything he isn’t ready for”.

Due to behaviour in his previous home, Reggie needs to be the only dog in his new one, “but he can have lots of friends to walk with or run around at the park”. Everyone at home, including visitors, must be over the age of 16, and Reggie “be kept away from any areas where food is being prepared else he becomes aroused and can be problematic”. This behaviour needs careful management from his new family.

Dogs Trust said: “Adopters must be willing to work alongside our training team once Reggie is home to ensure that he is progressing well in this area. Adopters will need to spend some time at the centre getting to know Reggie before taking him home, so that he can be confident when he leaves us. Reg is house trained but he isn’t used to being home by himself for more than an hour.”

Samson

Samson the lurcher
Samson the lurcher

“Gentle boy” Samson is “often found curled up on his bed with his favourite people” and is looking for a foster home. The lurcher “happily greets people when out and about” and “does a little happy dance when it’s time for his walkies, but is ever so good at having his harness and lead put on”.

He has lived with a dog before, so should be fine in a foster home with an existing dog, preferably “an older, steadier one”. Samson is house trained and can live with children aged 12 and over, but he’s currently receiving anti inflammatories for a little pain in his hips, and he may need these long term. Dogs Trust said: “Keep an eye on Samson in the kitchen, the cheeky so and so loves to raid the bin.”

Sasha

Sasha the German shepherd
Sasha the German shepherd

This “beautiful young” German shepherd is nervous in new situations by warmed to her handlers and looks to them for comfort. She needs a patient family who’ll take their time with her. Dogs Trust said: “She’s very curious and affectionate and just needs to be allowed to do things at her pace. She isn’t showing much interest in toys or treats just now but we’re hoping that will change as she settles more each day.”

Sasha would love a quiet household where any children are of older teenage, and she is the only pet. She doesn’t get along with cats, and she flinches if other dogs show interest in her. Sasha will “need to be settled and have trust and confidence in her new family before any four legged friends are introduced”. She is house trained and she can clear a five foot fence, so a secure garden is a must.

Shelby

Shelby the French bulldog
Shelby the French bulldog

Shelby is “extremely active” and enjoys walks, making sure to give everywhere “a thorough sniff”. His scent marking is something to monitor at home. He gets “excitable when being fussed and groomed”, so potential owners should “build up a positive association with formal handling as it will help him be more comfortable” at the vets.

The “very friendly boy” can be easily worried by sudden movements when he doesn’t know you, and he can get “overwhelmed and reactive towards other dogs”. Building up that confidence with distraction work and slow introductions would help him be able to walk alongside dogs. He enjoys his treats, which is ideal for training.

Dogs Trust said: “Care should be given when in the vicinity of other dogs on walks and be carefully managed. With this in mind, we are looking for a home where Shelby is the only dog in the home and any children in the home will ideally be aged 12 or above. As Shelby came as a stray, we do have limited information on him so are unsure about housetraining.”

Skye

Skye the American bulldog
Skye the American bulldog

This two-year old American bulldog is deaf, and was worried when she first arrived at Dogs Trust, building “a wonderful bond with her carers but was still suspicious of the rest”. Skye had surgeries for a damaged cruciate ligament in her knee, was placed in a foster home to aid in her full and speedy recovery.

The large dog “is now a confident, smooshy girl who just loves human company”, happily falling asleep in your arms. Dogs Trust said: “She likes to know where you are at all times and can sometimes be a little demanding for attention if you’re working. Skye loves to travel and have adventures outside of the house and has really started to relax on walks, passing other people and dogs without any problems.

Skye’s foster family has been teaching her simple signs and gestures. She’ll let you know when she needs the toilet, and she can now settle for two hours by herself. Dogs Trust said: “She loves to sunbathe and has been going for regular walks to help her legs to heal. Skye doesn’t like an environment with too much going on, so a quiet household where any kids are aged over 16 and there are no other pets.”

Spindle

Spindle the lurcher
Spindle the lurcher

“Loving and sweet” Spindle was found as a stray. She gets so excited when she’s going out for a walk, but she stands still while her handlers get her ready with her harness and lead. Spindle enjoys a game of fetch and “is always curious when out and about and likes to stop to say hello to people, or investigate anything that smells interesting”.

The house trained lurcher is “rather undersocialised and and lacks confidence when it comes to meeting other dogs”, but she’s happy to walk with them “if she is introduced slowly and properly”. Any children living in or visiting the home she goes to must be 10 or over, as Dogs Trust doesn’t know if she has any experience around young kids.

The charity said: “Spindle is going to need a home with a garden as she doesn’t like to toilet when out on a walk. Spindle loves to travel in the car and does so very quietly. She would like a home where someone is around for most of the day, but the time she spends alone can be built up gradually. She is quiet in the home and doesn’t bark. Best not leave any food where Spindle can reach it as she will find it and do her best to pinch it.”

Spot

Spot the crossbreed
Spot the crossbreed

Spot the crossbreed came to Dogs Trust when a baby was born in the family and it made him uncomfortable. the eight-year-old “is rather set in his ways, and is looking for a committed family who will let him settle back in to a home life”, in an adult-only home.

he wasn’t keen on being handled at first, but he’s “built a bond with his carers since, and now approaches them for a good fuss”. Spot has shown a liking to plastic balls. Dogs Trust said: “If you’re looking for an independent friend who doesn’t need a lot of attention, Spot’s your man.”

The charity added: “He takes a long time to get used to someone and we will need you to be committed to visiting him multiple times at the centre, as well as working with our training and behaviour team. Spot isn’t a fan of other dogs but he will walk alongside those he’s a little more familiar with, but chooses to have no interaction. He is perfectly house trained and can be left for a few hours once he has settled in.”

Stella

Stella the German shepherd
Stella the German shepherd

Stella is a lively, energetic girl who needs a new home with no other dogs and with any children in the family being 14 or older “due to her being uncomfortable with overhandling”. The young dog finds new environments worrying, but time and patience help her feel more comfortable.

She enjoys a good toy, but can get bored of them after a short period, so it’s important for her adopters to encourage toy play and provide her with plenty of enrichment. Dogs Trust said: “On assessment, Stella jumped straight into the car and was quite happy and excited for the staff member to take her somewhere exciting, she has previously been quite a quiet traveller. Stella isn’t keen on brushes during the daily clean so slow introductions to this object would be advisable if it was to be used a lot in the new home.”

Her new owners should be able to give her the space she needs in the home. She’s “very happy when playing with other dogs”, but they can be too much for her. Dogs Trust advised any new owners “to build up her social skills on walks with other friendly dogs and work on focus work around other dogs”. Stella needs her alone time built up gradually, otherwise she will become destructive at home.

Thor

Thor the dogue de Bordeaux
Thor the dogue de Bordeaux

This goofy three-year-old “has no concept of his own size and strength” and needs a home with no children or other dogs, and few visitors.. He’s “wonderfully playful but can be quite clumsy and doesn’t really focus on what he’s grabbing, so you might find yourself with sore fingers now and again”. The dogue de Bordeaux isn’t always great with unfamiliar people and lunges at them occasionally.

Potential adopters need to meet him quite a few times at the centre, and will need to be mindful of this behaviour once he’s home. He is currently being trained to accept a muzzle by the staff, which needs to be with carried on at home.

Thor “is wonderful once he’s comfortable with you”, and will walk with other dogs, “but he behaves very differently with the same dog on different days”. His previous owner reported that Thor is house trained and can be left alone for a few hours.

Toby

Toby the lurcher
Toby the lurcher

Dogs Trust said Toby “is the sweetest dog who enjoys a gentle fuss and snuggling up on his sofa”. The eight-year-old lurcher needs ongoing pain relief for arthritis, but he still enjoys “running around after his toys and generally being downright silly”.

The “active lad” loves being outdoors, will happily walk and explore for hours, and “can be quite strong when he’s on his lead”. The clever dog “picks things up very quickly, and can be outrageously affectionate at times”. He’s selective with which dogs he gets along with, with a preference for leggy dogs like himself, so he needs to be the only pet at home, and it’s best to introduce him slowly to any potential walking buddies.

He “goes off like a mad thing” when he’s overstimulated, so “t’s preferable that he has calm fun unless he’s got the room”. The housetrained dog is most suited to living in a home without children, and he needs to be visited quite a few times at the centre to build trust and a bond with him before he goes home.

Dogs Trust said: “He adores people and really enjoys human company. He would appreciate being allowed to run off lead somewhere, such as a secure hired field. Toby has spent a few days at a time at a volunteer’s house, where he has been perfectly behaved.”

Twix

Twix the Yorkshire terrier is one of many dogs up for adoption at Dogs Trust Merseyside
Twix the Yorkshire terrier is one of many dogs up for adoption at Dogs Trust Merseyside

Twix is “an independent chap” who enjoys “a fun and exciting walk” and loves “a good fuss”. He “doesn’t even mind being picked up when needed and is instantly friendly with everyone he meets”. Dogs Trust said: “A great way to build a bond with Twix is through his love of toys, he enjoys playing and interacting with any kind of toy or tasty treat. He is an active terrier so would benefit from someone who is willing to give him physical and mental stimulation. Twix has been a little nippy with clothes when he gets over excited therefore this will need to be monitored in the home.”

He needs to be the only dog at home due to being unsure of how to interact with other dogs. The charity said: “He can politely walk next to them so would benefit from going out with some walking friends and building that confidence up around them. Ideally, we would recommend any children or visiting children to be 10 years or old due to his behaviour around nipping at clothes.”

Source link

Stay in Touch

To follow the best weight loss journeys, success stories and inspirational interviews with the industry's top coaches and specialists. Start changing your life today!

spot_img

Related Articles